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Quick & Easy Thanksgiving Banner Tutorial

Quick & Easy Thanksgiving Banner

I’ve never been much of a seasonal decorator. Partially because it can be a lot of work! But when I saw these chipboard letters, I knew this would be one holiday craft I could actually do! This took me less than 20 minutes including taking pictures. I wanted to share a tutorial with you so that you can make your own (if you can even call it that with how easy this is)! :)

Thanksgiving

Supplies:

  • Hot Glue Gun
  • Ribbon of choice (I used 1/2in green burlap ribbon for mine!)
  • Chipboard letters – I found these in the $1.50 bins at Michaels!

Steps:

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Cut your ribbon into 2 pieces. These could be as long as you like- I ended up cutting my ribbon spool in half. Next, choose your saying and lay it out on the ribbon until you like the spacing. You could do this all on 1 ribbon if you wanted as well, I happened to like the 2 layer look :)

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Start at the middle and take one letter out.

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Apply hot glue to the top portion of the letter that overlaps the ribbon.

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Then stick the letter back into place. Repeat with each of the remaining letters, one at a time, until finished! Note: make sure you do this on a hard surface as the hot glue could soak through your ribbon and adhere to the surface!

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All done! Just use some tape or nails and hang it up wherever you’d like! Holiday crafting doesn’t get much easier than this! And it got tons of complements at my family’s thanksgiving dinner too (we celebrate early as we are usually all busy the day of)!

Until next time!

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Craft with a Fat Quarter Swap

Craft Swap Addict Part One…

I’m kind of addicted to craft swaps… no really- I have participated in 21 so far with my first one being back in 2005! And I still have 2 more in progress! Most of my swaps have been through Craftster- including my latest swap finish for the “Craft with a Fat Quarter” swap! In this swap, we were challenged to make items for our partner using only 2 fat quarters! It was such a fun challenge to figure out how to fit the projects using such a limited fabric! I wanted to share what I made for my partner today. My partner loved this Bonnie & Camille strawberry fabric, so I went with that and a coordinating red fabric. The two fabrics in the corner are the 2 fat quarters I sent with the package for her to use. My partner had tons of great inspiration pinned, so I used those and lots of tutorials to make these items!

Pincushion & Removable Thread Catcher

One of the items she had pinned was a thread catcher, so I decided to make this my biggest project. The pin cushion was a simple rectangle with a loop for the basket attachment. I weighted it down with door hinges wrapped in foam batting so that it wouldn’t slip and then stuffed it with polyfill. For the basket, I started with the thread catcher tutorial from The Sewing Chick & modified it to fit my needs. You can find the tutorial for my version Here! I used foam batting on the basket to add structure so the basket could stand up and be used on its own. I also added a button so that it could be attached to the pin cushion to hang off of the table.

 Checkbook Cover - Closed

Checkbook Cover - Open

My next largest project was a checkbook cover which my partner had pinned as well. I used the tutorial from Small Fry & Co for this. I used some cute coordinating heart ribbon for the page holder and thin elastic for the button closure.

Vinyl Lace Zipper Pencil Pouch

I also made a little sweet pencil pouch from the tutorial at A Spoonful of Sugar. However, I made the outer from 1 piece instead of a patchwork. I used my Cricut to add a doily edging along the zipper with heat apply vinyl (free doily .svg courtesy of Bird’s Cards). I finished it off by adding a little strawberry charm on the zipper!

Charm Square Fabric Tray

At this point, I was getting down to some smaller scraps! Since she liked organizing, I decided to make her a charm square fabric tray (tutorial also from A Spoonful of Sugar! Can you tell I adore her work? I love these for holding little items in my sewing space to keep things more organized!

Sewing Machine Pedal Non-Slip Pad

My project using the least fabric was the non-slip sewing pedal pad! I was inspired by the tutorial on So Sew Easy, but I had to adjust it because of my fabric constraints. The bottom of the pad was made from 2 layers of non-slip material, quilted in star to keep the layers together. I then used a 1in wide strip of fabric to bind the edges! I added the front padded stop & added little pieces of ribbon on the edges since my fabric wasn’t quite wide enough!

Embroidered Hexagon Keychain

My smallest project was a little hexie key chain. I embroidered the strawberries & used the heart ribbon to make a loop for the key chain. These are so simple and quick!

This swap definitely challenged my planning skills. I have to say, a lot of graph paper & excel was used in this swap!! But in the end, I was surprised how many projects I could make with just 2 fat quarters! Now to move on to the projects for my 2 swaps in progress!

Thanks for reading! :)

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Thread Catcher / Fabric Basket Tutorial

Thread Catcher Tutorial

I decided to make my first blog post a tutorial because one of my main objectives of this blog is to give back! I have been inspired by so many amazing craft blogs and have used many patterns & tutorials from them. So I wanted to kick things off with my version of a thread catcher! I was inspired by the awesome tutorial over at The Sewing Chick. Her tutorial is for a patchwork thread catcher, but the swap I made this for limited us to using 2 fat quarters. I made my own version with some different techniques which I am going to share with you here (with permission of course!).

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Supplies:

  • One 13 x 10 in piece of fabric for the outer shell
    • Note: This will be folded in half, so a directional print is not recommended or one side will be upside down
  • One 14 x 10 in piece of fabric for the lining
    • This will be the binding for the top edge too so again directional prints are not recommended
  • One 15 x 12 in piece of foam stabilizer (I used In-R-Foam Sew In. You could use regular quilt batting as well but it would not be as rigid).
  • Basting Spray (I used 505 brand. You could also pin baste if you prefer!)
  • Wonder Clips
  • Washable Marker
  • Rotary cutter, ruler, & mat
  • 1 Curious Cat (Optional)

— Tutorial! —

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First, use your basting spray (or pins) to adhere your outer fabric to the foam stabilizer.

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Next, draw on your quilting lines. For mine, I chose to do a diamond pattern. To do this, I lined up the 45 degree line on my ruler with the side of my outer piece making sure the line will go through the corner. I then marked this with my washable marker.

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Next, I repeated this step for my top corner in the other direction.

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Once I had my 2 starting lines drawn, I drew in the rest of my lines spacing them 1.5 in apart.

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Here are my finished quilting lines. Now it’s time to quilt the outer panel! I used my usual sewing foot and line it up with each of my drawn lines.

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I like to quilt every other line first starting on the same side. I then quilt the rest starting from the opposite side. The left picture shows my quilting after the first direction. I do this to avoid pulling the fabric & creating wrinkles which can happen if you go in the same direction for every line. The right is an example of one of my first quilted items. You can see how the fabric pulls to the side- I should have alternated sewing directions (and basted better)!

Note: If you are using a walking foot you can skip this step- I am just too lazy to put mine on for these small projects!

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After you finish quilting the panel, we are going to wash out the marked quilting lines. I use a white washcloth and a cup of filtered water for this.

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Here is the panel with all the marker washed out. Next, trim away the excess foam on your quilted panel.

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Fold your quilted panel and inner fabric in half “hamburger style” (fold the longer side in half) and pin/clip the folded sides. I like to clip my quilted panels with wonder clips since it is thicker and pin the lining.

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Sew the quilted panel with a 3/8 in seam allowance on both sides leaving the top open.

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Sew the lining with a 1/2 in seam allowance on both sides leaving the top open. This will make the lining a tiny bit smaller than the outer fabric which helps the lining to lay flat.

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Here are the finished inner & outer pieces.

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Next, we are going to mark the bottom corners. To do this, line up the bottom fold with the 1.75in mark on your ruler. For the side, line up the 1.75in mark with your seam line (not the edge of the fabric). Do this on both corners of the outer & lining panels.

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After you have your panels marked, cut out the bottom squares. I like to do this with scissors as I always seem to overshoot with my rotary cutter!

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Once the squares are cut out, open up the bottom corner and center the side seam as shown. Again, I like to clip my quilted panels and pin my lining fabric. Do this for both corners on the outer and lining.

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Sew the bottom corners with a 1/2 in seam allowance. As you sew, be sure to open up the seam allowance on the side seam to reduce bulk.

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On the quilted panel, trim down the seam allowance at the top edges. This will reduce the bulk near the binding.

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Here are the completed outer & lining panels! Now it’s time to assemble!

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Turn your outer panel right side out. Place your lining (still inside out) inside the outer panel. Line up the side seams and push the lining around until it is seated inside the outer nicely.

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Pin the bottom of the basket. I like to do this to make sure the lining doesn’t creep up on me when I am binding it in the next step.

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To bind, start by folding the lining in half as shown.

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Next, fold this over the top edge of the quilted panel and secure with a wonder clip. The raw edge of the lining is now tucked inside the binding.

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Continue this process around the basket, folding & clipping as you go. It may take a little wiggling since your lining is a tiny bit smaller than the outer panel, but you should be able to get it folded over all the way around and clipped.

From here- you can choose to hand bind or machine bind. I haven’t been brave enough to try hand binding yet, so I will show you how I machine bind!

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To bind on my machine, I remove the flat portion so that I can use the free arm. I use my edge stitching foot to sew on the binding.

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Insert the basket under the foot. I line up the binding to the blade on my edge stitching foot. I then adjust my needle so that I will be catching about 1/8 in of the binding. I then sew all the way around the basket removing the clips as I approach each one. Then, I trim my threads and I am finished!

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There you go! You now have a handy little thread catcher that can stand up on its own! You can also use this as a small bin for storing other notions or at your door for your wallet/keys!

I hope you have enjoyed this tutorial! If you have any questions or comments, please let me know!

Thanks for reading!!

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