Tagged quilting

Minis-1

You’ve Gotta be Kitten Me! Two Mini Quilts!

Not only do I love lame puns- I am also a crazy cat lady… and proud of it! I have two adorable kitties, Chloe & Luna, who I love to pieces! So when I saw the Litter Blox pattern by Lillyella, I knew I just had to make one of my kitties!
 Minis-2
For Luna, I adapted the pattern to include a second flying goose block for her black chin.
 Minis-3
Chloe is a tortoiseshell, so she doesn’t have distinct markings- so I went with a brown fabric with black designs to represent her coloring and left out the white markings in the pattern. I decided to try some matchstick quilting on this one and I love the texture! I finished it off with some white polka dot binding done by machine. Overall, I loved this pattern! It was very well written and went together easily. I completely recommend it!
 Minis-4
And because I couldn’t help myself, here is a bonus kitty picture!!!
Sewing-1
 The second mini was really my first try at “complicated” quilt piecing! I used the Machine Sewing Mini pattern by Sew Lux. It was very well written! I added some patchwork at the top and bottom and kept the quilting simple. I also embroidered around the sewing machine to help it pop a little more!

 

Until next time!
Sig
Pillow Swap Sharp-10

Quilted Pillow Swap!

I signed up for the Pillow Talk Swap on Instagram this year! My partner liked bright colors, high contrast, and radial patterns. So I designed a version of a Mariners Compass for her!

Pillow Swap Sharp-5

I drew up this design based on my partners inspiration mosaic. I then scanned my drawing into the computer and used Quilt Assistant to make it into a foundation paper piecing pattern! This is my first time designing my own paper piecing pattern, so this was a fun adventure!

Pillow Swap Sharp-2
Pillow Swap 1 sharp

I chose some topstitch quilting around the edges of each color. I wanted to keep the emphasis on the design. For the back, I pieced a simple design with a lapped zipper!

Deluxe Pincushion with Tallahassee Block

For the extras, I went with a blue & green theme (her favorite color combo and mine!). I started with a deluxe pincushion from the book Sew Organized for the Busy Girl. Instead of a 9 patch for the pocket, I made a mini Tallahassee block using the pattern from Quilter’s Cache.

Hexagon Fabric Tray with EPP Applique DetailFor my next extra, I made a hexagon fabric tray using the tutorial from A Spoonful of Sugar. I appliqued on an English paper pieced star and did a little echo quilting on the inner!

Patchwork Key FobFor my last extra, I made a cute little patchwork key fob! Each stripe is only 0.5in wide! I used strip piecing to make this less fiddly :)

Overall, this swap pushed me to try a lot of new things! I made my own foundation paper piece pattern, played with much more contrast than I usually do, and came up with a design outside of my comfort zone! I absolutely loved this journey and I am glad my partner liked it! :) Until next time!

Sig

Butterfly & Flower Baby Quilt

Double the Quilts, Double the Fun!

When I found out that my sister in law was having a baby girl, I knew I had to make the baby a quilt! I also decided to make her son a quilt as well! I even managed to finish in time for Christmas! These are my 3rd and 4th quilts ever, and I couldn’t be happier with how they turned out!

Butterfly & Flowers Baby Quilt - Details

For the baby girl’s quilt, I decided to do some paper piecing! I used the awesome butterfly pattern from the Tartan Kiwi for the centerpiece of this quilt. This is the most detailed paper piecing I have done, and I love how it turned out! I added a pink border then a ring of pretty flowers! I didn’t use a pattern for these. I finished with white and purple borders!

Butterfly & Flowers Baby Quilt - Border DetailFor the border, I decided to do something a little fancier- but that I could still do with my walking foot. I used my Cricut to design and cut templates for these scallops & corners. I then traced these on with water soluble markers and quilted with my walking foot (and a lot of arm muscle! Now I know why people say they wrestle their quilts!).

Butterfly & Flowers Baby Quilt - Minky Backing

I backed the quilt with the softest minky I have ever felt! I also loved how the minky showed the quilting on the back!

Quilted Butterfly Pillow

 I also made a matching pillow! The butterfly pattern is also from the Tartan Kiwi.

Quilted Butterfly Pillow - Quilting DetailI chose simple quilting 1/4 in from the seams. I also stitched in the ditch around the butterfly’s wings! I was happy to see that it matched the baby’s room perfectly!Car Play Mat QuiltMy nephew is 2.5 yrs old, so when I saw this awesome race car panel from Deborah Edwards I knew it would make a perfect play mat quilt for him! I bought 2 panels and cut off 1 side border from each. I then rotated one side by 180 degrees and sewed them together. That means this quilt had a whopping 1 seam! 😉

Car Play Mat Quilt - Cross Hatch Quilting DetailI kept the quilting simple and did a 1.5in crosshatch. This took way longer than I expected but I love it!

Car Play Mat Quilt - BackingFor the back, I used a cool car print that I got from the Missouri Quilt Company. I finished it off with checkered binding!

Car Play Mat Quilt - In UseHere is my nephew enjoying his quilt on Christmas morning!

I loved making these and learned so much! I also can’t wait to start on my new projects for 2016! Until next time!

Sig

Encircled Love - Free Mini Quilt Pattern

Encircled Love – Free Mini Quilt / Table Topper Pattern

This year, I decided to participate in the Try Something New Every Month challenge hosted by Stephanie & Rebecca! You can read the details at Swoodson Says or Hugs Are Fun. The theme for January is Quilting! I decided to make this heart mini quilt / table topper (& free pattern!)

This was my first time writing a pattern, spiral quilting, making my own bias tape, and binding a circle! Lots of firsts here! I absolutely loved it! I am so happy to be able to share the pattern here free! You can download it by clicking here.

I thought of this idea in bed one night and I had to write it down before I forgot! It took a few months to have time to make the pattern, but after Christmas I finally had time to try this out!

Close up of my (slightly wiggly) spiral quilting! I used my walking foot and followed the tutorial here. It was harder to keep the circles consistent than I expected, but the effect is still pretty! I also added a teeny little heart at the center!

If you use the pattern, I’d love to see it! Tag it with #EncircledLove so I can see! :) And if you have any questions or issues, please let me know at Kittensandthreads@gmail.com!

Thanks!

Sig

Cricut English Paper Piecing Template Tutorial

English Paper Piecing Template Cricut Tutorial

My sweet Mom surprised me last summer with a Cricut Explore! I haven’t done much paper crafting in the past, but I’ve found tons of uses for my Cricut from wood blocks, to iron on vinyl, to making the templates for my English paper piecing! It took me a while to work out how to get the right size/shape templates, so I wanted to write up a tutorial for anyone else who would like to do this! I include directions for hexagons, diamonds, squares, pentagons, and octagons below!

– Hexagon Tutorial –

Note: You will need a Cricut that interfaces with the online Cricut Design Studio- not one of the older models with the cartridges. If you have an older model that uses Cricut Craft Studio program, I made a similar guide which you can find here! (Note: You can only make hexagon, squares, and diamonds in this program. Also the holes cannot be added- but you can add them with a hole punch after!)

Tip: You can click on the images to open them in a new window for a closer view!


Open the Cricut Design Studio & start a new project.

shapes-hexagon
Click “Insert Shapes” and select a hexagon.


I like to add a hole in my templates for easy template removal. To do this, Click “Insert Shapes” again and select the circle. Click on the circle to adjust your circle size. I usually make mine around 0.4in.


Click and drag your circle to the middle of your hexagon.


Select the circle then hold the “Shift” key and select the hexagon. Click on the “Layers” tab in the sidebar and then click “Slice”. This cuts the circle out of your hexagon for you.


Select the circle in the middle and press delete on your keyboard. Select the circle and click delete a second time. You are now left with your hexagon template!


Adjust your hexagon width to your desired size per the table below. The height will update automatically!

Select your hexagon and click “Copy” then “Paste” until you have your desired amount of hexagons. No need to organize them in this view, Cricut will move them automatically when you go to cut.


When you are ready to cut, click “Cut” and follow the Cricut directions for making your cut. I like to use office supply cardstock for my templates. For mine, I set my Cricut halfway between “Light Cardstock” and “Cardstock”. Cut out your shapes and remove from your Cricut mat! You are all finished!

– Diamond Tutorial –

shapes-Diamond

Follow the same steps as above, but inserting a diamond instead of a hexagon.


Click on the diamond and click “edit”. Then, click on the lock symbol next to the sizes. This will allow you to change the diamond proportions.

diamond compare

Use the size tables below to determine the right width & height for the size & shape diamonds you want!

60degdiamonds

45degdiamonds

36degdiamonds

– Square Tutorial –

squareshape

Follow the same directions as hexagons but choose square.

square shape

For the size, use the side length you want for both the width and height.

– Pentagon Tutorial –

shapes-pentagon

Follow the same steps as above, but inserting a pentagon instead of a hexagon.

Then use the size tables below to determine the right height. The width will update automatically!

pentagonsize

– Octagon Tutorial –

shapes-octagon

Follow the same steps as above, but inserting a octagon instead of a hexagon.

Then use the size tables below to determine the right width. The height will update automatically!

octogon

I hope this helps! If you have any questions, let me know! :)

Thanks!

Sig

Cricut English Paper Piecing Template Tutorial

Pineapple Mini Mini Quilt

Jumping on the Pineapple Bandwagon!

I just couldn’t resist the adorable pineapple block by Jackie Padesky Quilts any longer! After finding the #miniminiquiltswap on Instagram, I knew it was a match made in heaven! I present my mini mini pineapple quilt!

Pineapple Mini Mini Quilt

The finished quilt comes in at just over 3.5×4.5in (the squares are ~0.5in finished!). Since this was so small, I had to use some odd construction techniques. I used strip piecing for my yellow & bottom green rows which made it much less fiddly. There was a lot of trial an error used when figuring out how to do the half square triangles without having to piece 0.5 in squares accurately. I ended up using larger squares to make the HST’s and cutting them down to size after they were sewn for the top 2 green pieces. For the HST’s at the end of the strip piecing, I laid a larger white square on top and sewed across the strip square diagonally. I then pressed and trimmed it down to size.

Pineapple Mini Mini Quilt - Detail

For the quilting, I kept the border simple and chose a cross hatch pattern for the pineapple to mimic the natural pineapple texture. I also went outside my comfort zone and tried hand binding! I attached the binding to the front by machine then folded it over and hand stitched it to the back. This way it wouldn’t show if it was wonky! And of course I forgot to take a pic of it! I don’t love the ladder stitch- so I doubt I’ll ever do this on a full size quilt, but I’m glad I know how now!

Mini Quilt Wall

And here it is up on my mini quilt wall (posts on some of these to come!). Overall I am in love with this! I see many more mini mini quilts in my future! Side note: If you are wondering if my pineapple looks short- it does. I miscounted the number of yellow rows in the original block… Oops! But I still love my squat little pineapple!

Pineapple Mini Mini Quilt with Curious Kitty!

Bonus: Kitty Pic!

 

Thanks for reading!

name

 

Thread Catcher / Fabric Basket Tutorial

Thread Catcher Tutorial

I decided to make my first blog post a tutorial because one of my main objectives of this blog is to give back! I have been inspired by so many amazing craft blogs and have used many patterns & tutorials from them. So I wanted to kick things off with my version of a thread catcher! I was inspired by the awesome tutorial over at The Sewing Chick. Her tutorial is for a patchwork thread catcher, but the swap I made this for limited us to using 2 fat quarters. I made my own version with some different techniques which I am going to share with you here (with permission of course!).

Threadcatcher-2Threadcatcher-1

Supplies:

  • One 13 x 10 in piece of fabric for the outer shell
    • Note: This will be folded in half, so a directional print is not recommended or one side will be upside down
  • One 14 x 10 in piece of fabric for the lining
    • This will be the binding for the top edge too so again directional prints are not recommended
  • One 15 x 12 in piece of foam stabilizer (I used In-R-Foam Sew In. You could use regular quilt batting as well but it would not be as rigid).
  • Basting Spray (I used 505 brand. You could also pin baste if you prefer!)
  • Wonder Clips
  • Washable Marker
  • Rotary cutter, ruler, & mat
  • 1 Curious Cat (Optional)

— Tutorial! —

Threadcatcher-3 

First, use your basting spray (or pins) to adhere your outer fabric to the foam stabilizer.

      Threadcatcher-4

Next, draw on your quilting lines. For mine, I chose to do a diamond pattern. To do this, I lined up the 45 degree line on my ruler with the side of my outer piece making sure the line will go through the corner. I then marked this with my washable marker.

Threadcatcher-5

Next, I repeated this step for my top corner in the other direction.

Threadcatcher-6

Once I had my 2 starting lines drawn, I drew in the rest of my lines spacing them 1.5 in apart.

Threadcatcher-7Threadcatcher-8

Here are my finished quilting lines. Now it’s time to quilt the outer panel! I used my usual sewing foot and line it up with each of my drawn lines.

Threadcatcher-9Threadcatcher-10

I like to quilt every other line first starting on the same side. I then quilt the rest starting from the opposite side. The left picture shows my quilting after the first direction. I do this to avoid pulling the fabric & creating wrinkles which can happen if you go in the same direction for every line. The right is an example of one of my first quilted items. You can see how the fabric pulls to the side- I should have alternated sewing directions (and basted better)!

Note: If you are using a walking foot you can skip this step- I am just too lazy to put mine on for these small projects!

Threadcatcher-11   

After you finish quilting the panel, we are going to wash out the marked quilting lines. I use a white washcloth and a cup of filtered water for this.

Threadcatcher-12Threadcatcher-13

Here is the panel with all the marker washed out. Next, trim away the excess foam on your quilted panel.

Threadcatcher-14

Fold your quilted panel and inner fabric in half “hamburger style” (fold the longer side in half) and pin/clip the folded sides. I like to clip my quilted panels with wonder clips since it is thicker and pin the lining.

Threadcatcher-15

Sew the quilted panel with a 3/8 in seam allowance on both sides leaving the top open.

Threadcatcher-16

Sew the lining with a 1/2 in seam allowance on both sides leaving the top open. This will make the lining a tiny bit smaller than the outer fabric which helps the lining to lay flat.

 Threadcatcher-17

Here are the finished inner & outer pieces.

Threadcatcher-18Threadcatcher-19

Next, we are going to mark the bottom corners. To do this, line up the bottom fold with the 1.75in mark on your ruler. For the side, line up the 1.75in mark with your seam line (not the edge of the fabric). Do this on both corners of the outer & lining panels.

Threadcatcher-20Threadcatcher-21

After you have your panels marked, cut out the bottom squares. I like to do this with scissors as I always seem to overshoot with my rotary cutter!

Threadcatcher-22Threadcatcher-23

Once the squares are cut out, open up the bottom corner and center the side seam as shown. Again, I like to clip my quilted panels and pin my lining fabric. Do this for both corners on the outer and lining.

Threadcatcher-24

Sew the bottom corners with a 1/2 in seam allowance. As you sew, be sure to open up the seam allowance on the side seam to reduce bulk.

Threadcatcher-26

On the quilted panel, trim down the seam allowance at the top edges. This will reduce the bulk near the binding.

Threadcatcher-25

Here are the completed outer & lining panels! Now it’s time to assemble!

Threadcatcher-27

Turn your outer panel right side out. Place your lining (still inside out) inside the outer panel. Line up the side seams and push the lining around until it is seated inside the outer nicely.

Threadcatcher-28

Pin the bottom of the basket. I like to do this to make sure the lining doesn’t creep up on me when I am binding it in the next step.

Threadcatcher-29

To bind, start by folding the lining in half as shown.

Threadcatcher-30

Next, fold this over the top edge of the quilted panel and secure with a wonder clip. The raw edge of the lining is now tucked inside the binding.

Threadcatcher-31   

Continue this process around the basket, folding & clipping as you go. It may take a little wiggling since your lining is a tiny bit smaller than the outer panel, but you should be able to get it folded over all the way around and clipped.

From here- you can choose to hand bind or machine bind. I haven’t been brave enough to try hand binding yet, so I will show you how I machine bind!

Threadcatcher-33

To bind on my machine, I remove the flat portion so that I can use the free arm. I use my edge stitching foot to sew on the binding.

Threadcatcher-34    

Insert the basket under the foot. I line up the binding to the blade on my edge stitching foot. I then adjust my needle so that I will be catching about 1/8 in of the binding. I then sew all the way around the basket removing the clips as I approach each one. Then, I trim my threads and I am finished!

Threadcatcher-35

There you go! You now have a handy little thread catcher that can stand up on its own! You can also use this as a small bin for storing other notions or at your door for your wallet/keys!

I hope you have enjoyed this tutorial! If you have any questions or comments, please let me know!

Thanks for reading!!

signiture